39: Nutanix Weekly: Using a Bloomberg Keyboard with Nutanix Frame!

Dec 17, 2021

We are very excited to share a demo of the new Generic USB Redirection feature of the Nutanix Frame® DaaS solution (which is now available in Early Access with the release of Frame App for Windows 6.7 and later)!

Generic USB Redirection further expands Frame’s support for USB peripheral devices, including advanced/specialty devices such as Bloomberg® keyboards!

In this blog we will demonstrate the seamless integration of Bloomberg multi-function keyboards within a Frame session via the Frame App. For those unfamiliar, Bloomberg keyboards are specialized devices used by financial services customers to interface with the Bloomberg Anywhere™ solution. The keyboard not only includes Bloomberg-specific function and menu keys, but also built-in speakers as well as an integrated biometric fingerprint scanner for multi-factor authentication into Bloomberg Anywhere.

Host: Andy Whiteside
Co-host: Harvey Green
Co-host: Jirah Cox
Guest: Kevin Cooke
Guest: Michael Yannotti

WEBVTT

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Andy Whiteside: Everyone and welcome to episode 39 of new tactics weekly i’m your host Andy whiteside i’ve got a rather robust group today so we’ll do some quick introductions Harvey and gyro are with me as usual.

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Andy Whiteside: Harvey how’s it going.

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Harvey Green: it’s going fine, how are you.

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Andy Whiteside: i’m good i’m good I appreciate you getting this group together and gyro is no longer in a basement.

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Jirah Cox: Getting getting closer.

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Jirah Cox: T minus three weeks will be on a moving truck.

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Andy Whiteside: I think I promised myself i’d stop asking you about your move, but I can’t help myself, I see the boxes and I see background, this time than before, so.

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Jirah Cox: i’m happy to keep providing the Internet with random up I.

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Harvey Green: Still don’t believe it is.

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Harvey Green: Just moving boxes around in.

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nature.

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Andy Whiteside: Just wants to give the impression these taken some time to move.

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Harvey Green: that’s right.

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Andy Whiteside: Well let’s see we’ve got two special guests with us Kevin cook with an e C okay Kevin and Michael you know T do it right, Michael.

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Michael Yannotti: Now you’re not close enough.

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Michael Yannotti: yeah.

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Andy Whiteside: I got it wrong.

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Michael Yannotti: that’s fine.

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Andy Whiteside: So let’s let’s start with Michael since he’s talking at the moment, Michael what’s your role at new tactics.

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Michael Yannotti: So my role is a senior systems engineer, and the Northeast area covering New York and Connecticut.

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Andy Whiteside: OK, and then Kevin yourself.

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Kevin Cooke: I am a vdi or uc portfolio overlay for new tannic frame for end user computing workloads and I cover the Americas.

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Andy Whiteside: And I don’t know Michael how long you been to new tonics.

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Michael Yannotti: Just hit two years so like Tony five months, to be exact, Guy.

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Andy Whiteside: that’s pretty well i’m in the world of new tonics.

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Andy Whiteside: Which is uh.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah we got a new company, but been around for a while now.

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Andy Whiteside: And then Kevin How long have you been there.

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Kevin Cooke: Actually, a year now about exactly a year ago I joined new tonics but been in the uc game for for quite some time.

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Andy Whiteside: So Okay, so I got to dive into that one then Kevin what’s your where tell me about your uc game that kind of gamed yeah.

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Kevin Cooke: Ah, so the majority of my time I guess you’d say I was in the end user analytics space, I worked for a little company called liquid where.

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Kevin Cooke: And I was the worldwide product director for stratosphere ux so you know really everything from sizing right the The pre environment.

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Kevin Cooke: level set right whether that’s sizing and environment or determining use case, all the way through troubleshooting analytics forensics really the whole gamut of end user analytics and how they can help to benefit right uc workloads.

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Andy Whiteside: And so what was the compelling event to get you to come over to new mechanics and work on the frame team.

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Kevin Cooke: A great question um I think twofold.

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Kevin Cooke: I think modern you see as evolved rain in a modern daz or pass platform depending on which bucket you want to put us in is.

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Kevin Cooke: is really an important consideration I think platform is a part of that Protocol as a part of it.

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Kevin Cooke: But, equally, and probably more important, the Culture here is just awesome just the people, the environment, the DNA the philosophy their their maniacal focus on things like customer satisfaction and customer success it’s just off the charts for a large organization it’s just.

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Kevin Cooke: Strange right because you go to large organizations and you get a lot of I don’t care not my problem.

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Andy Whiteside: Right.

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Kevin Cooke: That is not the DNA here.

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Andy Whiteside: there’s some I posted some new tannic numbers over the weekend at the end of last week, and I saw him again on linkedin over the weekend and.

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Andy Whiteside: It their their their startup type number by startup I mean by the focus and what you guys like to talk about in terms of where your numbers are at and where they’re going and to me I don’t know that you ever have to get out of a.

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Andy Whiteside: startup mentality these days.

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Andy Whiteside: there’s always plenty of growth and opportunity to continue to evolve in ways that startups have historically involved and then your your blue chippers have settled in and became become boring, if you will yeah.

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Kevin Cooke: totally agree and and you know the company just does a really good job of keeping sort of that loose.

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Kevin Cooke: Informal atmosphere, but really finding you know sort of like birds of a feather we’re just.

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Kevin Cooke: You know everybody’s just maniacally focused on.

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Kevin Cooke: Making that customer happy and going above and beyond, and that’s you know for a 65 what do we 6700 employee organization it’s just very rare in my experience.

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Andy Whiteside: Now okay before we let you go, we got to tell people that we might get a visit from a cuckoo clock.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah so my.

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Kevin Cooke: My dad used to work.

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Kevin Cooke: For a buyer for us, the United States bear aspirin you know the aspirin people, but he used to work for buyer and used to make fairly regular trips out to headquarters in Germany and on one trip made up a quick stop off in the.

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Kevin Cooke: In the cuckoo clock region and brought me home a cuckoo clock old school metal pine cones you know the whole nine yards, and so as a bit of a nerd myself.

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Kevin Cooke: It is a i’ll say dynamic and ever changing environment, it just consistently requires dialing in accuracy right right Jeremy and a joke, you know the NTP service not very good on this device.

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Andy Whiteside: When they’d be.

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Jirah Cox: Like a joke that gyro would make.

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Andy Whiteside: You know, but I mean all the sudden that sounds like a great product right yeah the cuckoo clock the ties into an NTP server and of course I guess Kevin you must enjoy your slight tweaks every day and constantly chasing it.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah I was gonna say every every morning I wind up the wind up the poet pine coats put some you know known weights on the on the pendulum.

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Kevin Cooke: And I have to adjust it, you know by fingernail with increments to try to dial it in, and you just never by the time I get it right, the humanity changes the temperature changes and i’m doing it all over again.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah I grew up in a House full of grandfather clocks want to say three we have three of them.

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Andy Whiteside: And they were never right, but you, it was an everyday thing you had to chase them and It made me wonder whether it was somebody’s pocket watch from back you know 100 years ago or grandfather clock or whatever they there’s no way the time was ever right.

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Kevin Cooke: I was gonna say, the only way to get them to sync up would be to break two of them yeah.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah for sure.

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Andy Whiteside: So Kevin a little more Kevin Michael a little more in your background i’m sorry, you said you were on the engineer side of this.

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Michael Yannotti: yeah so um so pre sales engineer.

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Michael Yannotti: A prior to that funny enough, I did a lot of integrations on the citric side, probably about eight years so easy is definitely near and dear to my heart, which is what makes me really proud to work with Kevin on this.

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Michael Yannotti: A lot again a lot of citrix worked for a lot of different partners i’d rather not name names, but I knew of you guys i’ve known Harvey now for for quite some time.

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Michael Yannotti: And kind of coming here was was a three year process of learning about new tactics.

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Michael Yannotti: In working with a customer and then getting really bitten by the bug, so to speak, really seeing the solution.

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Michael Yannotti: build as it went from infrastructure to software upon software and different portfolio products and then finally getting here and really building on the passion of really helping customers, so it, it gives me many tools in my tool bag, rather than just one or two.

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Michael Yannotti: So yeah it’s been it’s been a it’s been a great ride since i’ve been here.

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Andy Whiteside: So, as you guys, let me share the share my screen and bring the pod the blog up go.

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Andy Whiteside: So, as you guys know if you work in EU see if you love working virtual delivery of windows applications and desktops in the financial sector.

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Andy Whiteside: At some point, that Bloomberg keyboard thing shows up and you gotta be able to solve for it, so I guess.

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Andy Whiteside: that’s where the story begins right you guys ran into a situation where you needed Bloomberg to work and do evolve, the product and make it work tell me tell me under set set up the store for us.

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Michael Yannotti: I guess I could start, and then I think Kevin will elaborate much better than I could so.

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Michael Yannotti: Finn surf customer obviously using Bloomberg and.

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Michael Yannotti: being that it was a requirement.

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Michael Yannotti: To have the multifactor biometric authentication that’s built in the keyboard.

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Michael Yannotti: They they were current they’re currently a citrix customer it’s still our citrix customer.

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Michael Yannotti: And we want that approve the solution out right so Kevin and I did some due diligence, I was able to get a Bloomberg keyboard.

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Michael Yannotti: got a test account got it all up and running on my home computer Kevin I did some zoom calls to make sure that you know we kind of got the gist of how it’s going to work and where where where where will and won’t play Nice.

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Michael Yannotti: In frame or in vdi in general, luckily we both have that background, with citrix in the uc so we’ve been kind of down this path, before.

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Michael Yannotti: And then.

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Michael Yannotti: I can hand it off to Kevin because we essentially just went from that first initial step of.

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Michael Yannotti: doing the test to make sure that I could get everything running on my computer which it all worked perfectly.

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Michael Yannotti: And then kind of segue into building it out on frame where there’s a lot of newer technologies that we’ve just built in Marin, and I think it would be best to segue that to Kevin to to complete the answer.

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Kevin Cooke: And no so from michael’s point of view, there was a I guess a bit of a confluence of two things right, a customer need at a specific point in time, but also from frame development perspective, we had.

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Kevin Cooke: just released into tech preview now early access generic USB pastor support and frame, so you know from a from an underpinnings from an architectural perspective that had been going on for quite some time.

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Kevin Cooke: But, at the time, specifically when Michael came to me, and you know we discussed how best to give a sort of a Bloomberg multifactor authentication experience to this customer.

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Kevin Cooke: We were ready from a frame perspective to be able to DEMO that based on you know some of those architectural changes that are in play and.

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Andy Whiteside: What were the the architectural changes, you can share that were the enabler for that.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah there’s a couple you know from the bottom up, it was really a wholesale shift in the way that we deliver the frame or molding protocol, the frame promoting protocol.

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Kevin Cooke: always right from its inception even pre acquisition back in 2012 the frame routing protocol was based on H dot 264 with the underlying transport of web sockets and tcp.

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Kevin Cooke: what’s most relevant here is the shift to leveraging still H 264 but now the transport is going to be web rtc.

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Kevin Cooke: From our friends at at Google and shifting now from web rtc to the transport of UDP.

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Kevin Cooke: You know, we don’t need to get into the merits of tcp versus UDP but you know the important consideration here is the real time communication support and, amongst other things, one of the major things that that’s going to enable is frames ability is support generic USB passer.

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Andy Whiteside: Okay, and then always bring up latency when you talk about USB pass through of you and your testing, have you seen how much latency you can stand in this scenario for to keep working fine.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah I mean the short answer is, it depends right if your question is, in the context, specifically of Bloomberg.

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Kevin Cooke: We have not done that testing right, and especially when we’re talking about.

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Kevin Cooke: You know folks that want to make sure that the length of cable from their desk to the data Center is the same length of cable from you know the guy who sits in the last row to the.

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Kevin Cooke: Right we’re not we’re not down to that level of sophistication here at this point from a testing standpoint, but I will say that you know broadly the shift from.

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Kevin Cooke: The prior web socket to the new web rtc actually increased all of the attributes in a positive direction, so we see.

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Kevin Cooke: You know that the latency is far more tolerant that the overall bandwidth utilization is almost half what it was before.

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Kevin Cooke: and, overall, you know we’re now able to do things like Bloomberg keyboard sport and fully encapsulated webcam support inside the frame session right, so no.

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Kevin Cooke: Side loading know offloading or split tunneling of webcam sessions, we can do them them natively in that session fully encapsulated in that session now.

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Andy Whiteside: jarrod you want to chime in.

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Jirah Cox: yeah or asked like that, since ucs not really my like long running background to ask a dumb question sounds like is the real enabler there the the generic USB support right, so now we don’t have a.

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Jirah Cox: opinionated list of like these devices work it’s more like we can sort of almost like pass the port through latency will, of course, affect outcomes.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah I know exactly yeah so so you know previously anything that could be deemed basic or advanced hd types of devices, so you know keyboard.

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Kevin Cooke: My speakers microphones etc, and anything that would sort of map to a basic or advanced each ID type of device I don’t mean to dullness my acronyms there would just kind of work with frame.

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Kevin Cooke: And with this new generic USB support if if we can’t support it under basic or advanced each ID we, then, can you know essentially load a virtual USB driver on the host machine.

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Kevin Cooke: And it just essentially passes it through and the vm then says oh new windows device what’s this do you need to install a driver and we’re essentially just passing all of that USB interrupt over the channelized promoting protocol.

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Jirah Cox: very slow.

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Kevin Cooke: Very native very seamless and it allows us.

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Kevin Cooke: You know, to to deliver with frame a very sort of low barrier of entry, what i’ll say low touch right on the client side as a modern provider of data services, one of the things that we really wanted to do was.

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Kevin Cooke: You know not overcomplicate the client side requirement right, especially for environments that are looking at prioritize you know be wow choose your own see ya all kinds of attributes with very little touch on that end node.

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Andy Whiteside: So, and I agree with the gyros new discovery of how valuable it is to be able to pass through native USB so that whatever you plug in can now work how about the ability to tell things that you don’t want to pass through not to pass through.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah great question right, so this is early access it’s just outside of tech preview so.

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Kevin Cooke: Step one you know get it to work broadly and and you know to your point gyro and Andy it does open the floodgates right so certainly step two will be administratively locked down those floodgates were appropriate.

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Kevin Cooke: The good news is while recognizing the device on the end node is one part that happens at the end node and as part of what’s orchestrated by the.

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Kevin Cooke: Communication Protocol itself, the other necessary component is making sure that those drivers are loaded loaded in the workload vm right so in a non persistent environment.

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Kevin Cooke: Presumably, a user can’t really access or have administrative control over that vm so we do have some guardrails in place, and you know air gap and characteristics in place natively just by good administrative.

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Kevin Cooke: You know role based access control, but for a persistent environment, presumably there really be nothing from stopping an end user from installing a driver there and supporting really any.

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Andy Whiteside: device at that point yeah which in most environments you’re going to have a lot of non persistent, but those corner cases where you need persistent and let them do their own thing is.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah so.

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Andy Whiteside: What rounds out the solution.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah and we can turn off, we can turn off the ability to map through the protocol right that’s, not to say that it’s an all or nothing so we certainly we certainly can disable the ability to do generic USB but on a device by device.

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Kevin Cooke: You know sort of laser precision that that we couldn’t do on day one.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah hey Kevin i’ve got a question for use on topic with slightly off topic, and that is you’ve mentioned frame as a path you’ve mentioned it as a dad and what, how can you explain to our audience where frame fits into either one of those statements.

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Kevin Cooke: Absolutely, and I think it gets down to at least from my perspective of you know, a shared definition set right if you talk about vdi predominantly people think about on premises infrastructure and a broker stack that they manage.

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Kevin Cooke: And you talk about daz you know, most people sort of stereotype and immediately think well, these are cloud workloads well what if it’s both of those things right, and so.

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Kevin Cooke: it’s nuanced, but I think, important our definition and frame right, and you know you don’t have to take my word for it gartner has categories that aligned to what i’m about to share as well, but.

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Kevin Cooke: frame dis aggregates the control plane, so the difference between on Prem.

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Kevin Cooke: vdi right and cloud based dads in this case is who makes the sausage right in the case of vdi you have to make the sausage and own that entire stack before you can eat the sausage.

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Kevin Cooke: With daz you’re paying somebody else to make the sausage for you and you just eat it right so frame in that context.

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Kevin Cooke: Is daz in so much as the control plane is a dis aggregated cloud based management infrastructure, but you can run on premises vdi.

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Kevin Cooke: Instances with our control plane, or you can run cloud based vm with our control plane so we’re truly a hybrid platform in so much as we support infrastructure, wherever you want to run that infrastructure right.

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Andy Whiteside: The rv i’ll give you a chance to chime in here, if you have anything.

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Harvey Green: I mean I I think coming kevin’s covering it very, very little.

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Harvey Green: I mean, for the most part, you know we’ve already kind of hit on the major points of this right we’ve got Bloomberg keyboard that that’s working through but.

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Harvey Green: As you guys astutely pointed out, you know there’s there’s lots more functionality it’s coming through this, not just the Bloomberg keyboard, but it is definitely a great use case and check the box for what they needed for their financial customer at the time.

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Andy Whiteside: i’ll take a moment to just kind of walk through what I think I heard between Michael and Kevin in terms of the the testing methodology, which is.

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Andy Whiteside: get your stuff together try it native try it local make sure it all works, as expected, then stick it into a virtual world enable USB raw pass through.

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Andy Whiteside: and see if it then works again under the same testing scenarios, I know that sounds trivial but you’d be shocked the number of people i’ve run in through the years that.

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Andy Whiteside: didn’t take their native testing into the cloud and took the same methodologies, they just throw their hands up and said didn’t work or something.

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Michael Yannotti: And there’s.

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Kevin Cooke: And there’s and there’s multiple layers to that right, I think, Michael you know kind of sold himself a bit short right frank frame mix the administrative.

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Kevin Cooke: You know functions pretty easy, but you know you still need to make sure that you can make that Bloomberg anywhere application.

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Kevin Cooke: vdi aware right and when, regardless of whether you’re installing that in citrix or Amazon workspaces or whether you’re installing it, you know in any vdi.

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Kevin Cooke: If it’s a non persistent environment, then the application needs to happily coexist.

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Kevin Cooke: In a non persistent environment so certainly you know image management is still an important Gray matter centric skill set right we don’t automate that you still have to.

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Kevin Cooke: still have to be pretty good at at image management and installing the application from a you know from a protocol perspective and passing through the the USB it was pretty straightforward there wasn’t a lot of rocket surgery there for us to to get into.

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Andy Whiteside: divers big on rocket surgery.

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Michael Yannotti: In an Anti that to add to that and I think I think I like to keep things really simple because i’m, at least in this example being that Kevin and I both had.

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Michael Yannotti: Major easy backgrounds, luckily, it was first off it was it was meeting a customer need and then also realizing that.

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Michael Yannotti: We don’t have a validated solution for a lot of different things, which is what new Technics is now turning out a lot more than ever.

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Michael Yannotti: um but the funny thing is that you know those 10 or 15 steps that I did locally, we did the exact same thing in frame and without.

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Michael Yannotti: Really any tweaking it literally just worked right so that’s the true story that I like to tell especially around new Technics because the product developers every single Member on the frame team that that was involved.

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Michael Yannotti: engineers right we’re nothing without our engineers from a support standpoint, they they create the stuff.

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Michael Yannotti: um I mean it makes us look like heroes, I mean Kevin and I, you know, we have our name on this blog which is awesome it’s great visibility it’s great to show.

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Michael Yannotti: That we worked as a team to do this, but I mean there’s like we’re we’re just cogs in a massive massive machine a phenomenal engineers and support staff so i’m not a huge limelight guy Kevin knows that a lot of people who know me know that.

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Michael Yannotti: i’ve thanked everyone who’s been involved in this and, like I said no real tweaking we just kind of set it up.

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Michael Yannotti: And it literally just worked and we tried to break it we did other things to kind of see what was going on just kind of reverse engineer, but, in all honesty right great great product very simple setup and.

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Michael Yannotti: I mean, by far, one of the better uc solutions out there, amongst the other, the other two big names yeah.

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Andy Whiteside: Okay, the two demos that are listed here in the blog one is accessing Bloomberg anywhere with biometrics that’s one of the things you guys are trying to prove you could work through the USB pass through any the highlights on that one.

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Kevin Cooke: So, from a from a blog perspective, the first sort of DEMO one is the one where we’re doing that virtualized USB full generic USB passer so what you’re seeing is the.

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Kevin Cooke: Little call proprietary Bloomberg keyboard the hardware device that’s mapping through to a vm.

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Kevin Cooke: And leveraging really the richness of that device right we recognize that I believe Michael correct me from wrong, I think it was three or four different devices so it’s a.

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Kevin Cooke: keyboard was a biometric authentication device, it was speakers right we we saw it as a hub, and then multiple devices, as it was passed through.

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Kevin Cooke: So you see the full sort of walk through there and DEMO one that showcases how we map the device in and then natively pass through all those functions to the frame managed vm for DEMO to this is really the use case where perhaps.

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Kevin Cooke: you’re not on a PC you’re not on a place where we can virtualize that full generic USB pass through right, and so the Bloomberg device.

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Kevin Cooke: Essentially, fails to be recognized as a biometric device, and what you see, there is the Bloomberg anywhere software recognizes that the same hardware, is no longer present.

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Kevin Cooke: And instead asks you to authenticate via their their be unit right which is an external to a fan FA device which creates a code.

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Kevin Cooke: And what I thought was really cool about this is sort of twofold one it’s still using the same hardware we’re just not passing through all the intelligence.

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Kevin Cooke: But I think what’s really interesting here is, you know now we’ve got this external device.

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Kevin Cooke: it’s got this really cool if you’re not in the financial services world you haven’t seen this before it’s got this really cool sort of to have a MFA device that flashes on the screen captures this this you know sort of.

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Kevin Cooke: On off light thing to generate a six digit code and then you see Michael I did the voice overlay but you see Michael type in the six digit code, as he sees on the screen it’s just a cool.

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Kevin Cooke: I guess what i’ll call fall back right from a workflow perspective to show that the native Bloomberg anywhere software fully function did exactly what it was supposed to do.

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Kevin Cooke: But change the workflow when the generic usp was no longer being mapped through because of the client support for it.

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Michael Yannotti: But the cool thing to add to that too, with with the DEMO number two as it, as it shows on screen with my my lovely hand model and.

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Michael Yannotti: it’s it’s a little bit thicker and a little bit smaller than a credit card.

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Michael Yannotti: Where it still has a thumb reader or fingerprint reader but they they primarily tell you just use your thumb because when you grab it you hit the power button, you can see it in the video and as Kevin mentioned right the the vdi screen we’re using frame.

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Michael Yannotti: It doesn’t Morse code literally like a strobe and then that you know, on off light switch like that strobe that it does.

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Michael Yannotti: throws a six digit.

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Michael Yannotti: pin out and then you.

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Michael Yannotti: See there for six digits actually but you you keep that in and you now have access, so for people who don’t have Bloomberg keyboards for people who use Bloomberg anywhere via Bloomberg website.

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Michael Yannotti: You you have this little credit card device and it still works so so to kevin’s point.

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Michael Yannotti: If, for some reason USB paths passing fails, you still have a backup in a secondary MFA option, so that you’re not locked out of your Bloomberg I mean you could always call in and they could grant you access to, but primarily right it’s kind of.

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Michael Yannotti: it’s kind of which them call it like a.

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Michael Yannotti: Like a secondary use case, so that if one were to fail you’re kind of you know, helping yourself with another device that you can authenticate with.

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Andy Whiteside: rv Jerry any additional thoughts around the concept of this one particular use case showing off the ability to get the USB pastor.

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Harvey Green: I think.

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Harvey Green: Again, just shows metallics Bam flexible just making sure that they’re meeting their customer needs that you know they’re offering a product that’s going to be.

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Harvey Green: Something that will be used and use well by a variety of different customers, you know not just one vertical.

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Harvey Green: And I think that you know, one of the things that i’m always looking for is a company that is you know big enough to move, but still small enough to care about their customers and that’s that’s what we see out about new tonics yeah.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah I have a question for you Kevin where whereas new Technics Bowling with frame, are you just going to overtime just keep adding functionality to it and attack the space, the way you where you are here.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah that’s a great question.

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Kevin Cooke: You know, without getting into too much proprietary future you know feature sets you know, certainly it’s I think Harvey you know kind of nailed it right, I would say that we’re focused on meeting customers, where they want to be.

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Kevin Cooke: Right from an end user perspective it’s creating a seamless you know experience that’s commiserate with.

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Kevin Cooke: You know these laptops and computer devices that we’ve you know you’ll use for 20 plus years but from an administrative perspective, you know, certainly hybrid and multi cloud is very clearly part of where frame is going as a desegregated management control plane being able to support.

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Kevin Cooke: You know, business processing outsource kinds of use cases I have many, many customers.

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Kevin Cooke: Who don’t want to be building data centers all over the planet, they need to support users in Manila in Japan right in South America and frame is extremely flexible in so much as.

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Kevin Cooke: You can leverage the power of public cloud, but the same singular pane of glass to manage those end user workloads putting.

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Kevin Cooke: Like end user computing really hasn’t changed in the last 25 years right we’re we we still want to put the workload vm as close as we can to the end user, while at the same time.

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Kevin Cooke: Getting that workload vm close to those back end resources, whether that’s a database a CRM and your P, a financial services APP.

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Kevin Cooke: That hasn’t changed but frames ability now to leverage public and hybrid cloud in a vendor agnostic cloud agnostic way is where we’re seeing a lot of investment and a lot of desire from customers today.

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Andy Whiteside: And I get that question for time time can I use frame and other do I have to use it only with new tannic only with HIV and the answer is no right anywhere, we can put the.

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Kevin Cooke: The absolutely yeah absolutely you know, and we were just recently we’ve just recently gone live in.

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Kevin Cooke: In azure right, you can purchase the frame management infrastructure right from azure marketplace.

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Kevin Cooke: And, and you know I think that’s a testament to the fact that we, we just simply don’t care about.

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Kevin Cooke: The infrastructure, you know, one of the you asked me earlier why I, you know came to new tonics the other sort of nuanced answer is.

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Kevin Cooke: You tactics is awesome at making that infrastructure invisible, while there are many who still think of new tonics as a hardware company, the reality is.

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Kevin Cooke: I don’t really consider us a hardware company I think we’ve kind of moved away from that where we’re.

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Kevin Cooke: You know more of a solutions company that is enabling and facilitating this sort of hybrid and multi cloud next wave of need from a business perspective and frame is absolutely at the tip of the spear with regard to enabling that philosophy.

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Andy Whiteside: You know, and one of the reason announcements you guys had was your partnership with Joe were building in the ability to access frame through an eye gel device that was that’s pretty good for us, we have a lot of customers that are moving in the I Joe endpoint direction software.

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Kevin Cooke: yeah absolutely um.

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Kevin Cooke: it’s always interesting to me how how customers sort of land on you know endpoint management, you know, often as their primary decision.

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Kevin Cooke: For were critical success factor for for some type of next generation, you know you see whether it’s vdi or daz or what have you.

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Kevin Cooke: But, but certainly I would agree, you know, having support for I gel and a host of other you know thin client providers is really important we’ve got a very focused concerted effort on supporting an ecosystem of.

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Kevin Cooke: thin client vendors, you know, beyond the html5 stack right that’s it for frame, we want a modern html5 stack period, full stop full stop.

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Andy Whiteside: help me understand that, so the client is accessing over html is that that’s one of the course of how frameworks, right now, you guys have built the platform.

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Kevin Cooke: Correct as as a modern sort of forward looking platform, we wanted to build that you know sort of zero touch no plugins no extensions no application and for most use cases.

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Kevin Cooke: And when I say most use cases right think single monitor task worker knowledge worker that’s all we need is a single.

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Kevin Cooke: You know, a browser stack we do recommend a modern html5 stack not all html5 stacks are created equal.

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Kevin Cooke: So we do recommend one that’s well designed and well maintained and has all of the necessary prerequisites right when I talk about the new routing protocol leveraging web rtc.

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Kevin Cooke: That web rtc component is part of the html5 stack, and so we we do as a prerequisite, I recommend personally a something based on chromium.

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Kevin Cooke: But you’re really from a from a bare bones minimum perspective we’ve tried to develop the routing protocol and the solution overall to not require anything no touch no nothing if you’ve got a modern html5 browser frame is going to work for you yeah.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah I think that’s interesting how this type of solution brings.

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Andy Whiteside: That promise of 20 years ago that everything was going to be browser based it truly can be, because then you bring your x86 workloads into a browser based access solution and.

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Andy Whiteside: You truly have solved the gap for the Apps that can’t be or haven’t been developed into http based delivery at this point.

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Kevin Cooke: Exactly exactly.

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Andy Whiteside: Alright gyro I know we kept you a Bay, you know you being the end user compute expert.

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Andy Whiteside: Your chance to chime in here.

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Jirah Cox: it’s all it’s all super exciting I love.

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Jirah Cox: You know, getting the full suite just able to solve customer problems right so that’s that’s honestly super exciting for me.

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Andy Whiteside: Giving customers an alternative right a cost effective alternative that allows them to still accomplish many of their use cases user use cases scenarios that’s a that’s been a promise for a long time that has really happened over the last couple years.

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Jirah Cox: Totally.

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Andy Whiteside: Michael one more chance to chime in here.

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Michael Yannotti: And again, thank you guys, for having us um any I sent a message on the eye gel announcement, because we were we were waiting for that for a while, too, so.

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Michael Yannotti: um yeah I mean that that right there says it all i’ve been a huge fan of i’m jealous implemented in many places um it’s it’s a phenomenal and end solution, it helps me sell a lot of frame deals it even if it’s not a frame deal, it can be citrix we’re view.

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Michael Yannotti: We all know it supports it right it’s I try to be as holistic as possible i’m not i’m not just a new tactics, you know.

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Michael Yannotti: Pre sales engineer, so to speak, right, I try to provide a solution.

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Michael Yannotti: start to finish as holistic as possible, so to say, this is what you could do with your own points and then this is how you can access whatever easy you’re going to be using it just goes with the whole model of.

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Michael Yannotti: Giving the customer, you know what’s best for them, so we might we may not sell every single thing in there.

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Michael Yannotti: But they’re going to remember that a new Technics engineer, you know made other you know observations or suggestions around.

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Michael Yannotti: Whatever third party tools or technology that’s out there it’s I don’t need to sell you know all of us every single time which certain people really like to hear but i’ll tell you right now keeps customers coming back and i’d rather take care of them now.

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Michael Yannotti: and have them for the long run than not take care of them and have them never come back so again, thank you for the opportunity does.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah no thanks for joining and just further on this I gel announcement right you talk about being.

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Andy Whiteside: browser based you take a browser make it full screen and it works well and quick and fast it has features like USB pass through enabled you don’t know that it’s agent list at that point or client list I think that’s revolutionary for some people when they discover that.

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Andy Whiteside: Okay Harvey any additional comments.

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Andy Whiteside: No.

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Andy Whiteside: This is a quiet as you’ve ever been.

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Andy Whiteside: I know the people.

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Harvey Green: that that is a reflection on the job that Mike and Kevin did.

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Kevin Cooke: man.

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Michael Yannotti: We prepped for you.

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To this.

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Michael Yannotti: Thanks guys.

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Andy Whiteside: you’re just along for the ride jarrod he could have been over there box and stuff up that’s all.

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Jirah Cox: pretty much lost.

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Jirah Cox: Last packing.

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Jirah Cox: The.

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Jirah Cox: As a quick public service announcement right just given what week, it is, if you like, living under a rock you should probably know, to go check like your full infrastructure for this.

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Jirah Cox: Java logging vulnerability if it’s the first time hearing about it anything on your network with like an IP address.

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Jirah Cox: You should go get a response to your vendor mechanics included I won’t mention ours, because as soon as you hear this it’ll be out of date.

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Jirah Cox: Go get the latest info from every vendor but folks that I trust that don’t have a reason to amp this up say it’s like worse than heart bleed so go go do your diligence on on what you can do patch now yes good good public service announcement there absolutely.

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Andy Whiteside: I thought you were gonna go down the you could always take a test drive road.

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Jirah Cox: I mean people.

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Andy Whiteside: can access try.

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Jirah Cox: What what what wouldn’t test drive being.

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Andy Whiteside: lobbied opportunity which we have on the blog here, as you can always go whatever we talked about in the new tannic world there’s always the opportunity to go do a test drive, which is modern day way of saying give it a spin.

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Andy Whiteside: And it’s as I highlight all the time, I listened to these podcasts back myself it’s it’s amazing that we live in a world where we can talk about it and go test it without spending hours and hours of configuration which everybody on this call has great here, I think, to some degree.

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Andy Whiteside: Of Harvey has been great here but.

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Andy Whiteside: tons of time building test systems now you just click a few buttons and it appears, which is nice.

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Jirah Cox: nicely done.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah alright guys well thanks for joining.

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Andy Whiteside: us today and we’ll have you guys on if you have another topic at some other point we’ll keep an eye out for it but feel.

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Andy Whiteside: free to let us know and we’ll have you back on.

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Michael Yannotti: awesome sounds good thanks again.

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Kevin Cooke: Thanks guys thanks.