138: The Citrix Session: What’s New with Citrix — CVAD 2305 and Cloud Updates – Part 3

Jul 28, 2023

It’s no secret that Citrix continues to innovate and deliver new capabilities to make your environments more flexible, increase deployment speed, and improve end user experiences. Citrix is also fully committed to meeting organizations where they are in their deployment journeys, and the Citrix Universal subscription is only our first step in this journey. 

With the move toward Citrix Universal subscription, we are not only adding features to our Citrix DaaS cloud service, but we are continuing to add features and capabilities to on-premises deployments.

That’s why we are excited to announce the release of Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops 7 2305! This IT-managed current release delivers new end user enhancements, security capabilities, and much more that we will discuss below.

As we evolve and gain input from our customers, we are building more functionality inside of four major categories. We have broken out our feature updates into each of these groups: 

  • Operational and IT Efficiency
  • Workload and Device Flexibility 
  • Security and Compliance
  • Employee Experience Technology

Our approach goes beyond the traditional cloud and on-prem categorizations, providing a comprehensive overview of the capabilities offered by the Citrix platform. Let’s dive right into these developments!

Host: Andy Whiteside
Co-host: Bill Sutton
Co-host: Geremy Meyers
Co-host: Monica Griesmer 

WEBVTT

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Andy Whiteside: Hello, everyone! Welcome to Episode 138 of the Citrix session. I’m your host, Andy White side wanted to quickly hit the record, but so we could start talking because my my panelists here Bill Sutton, of course, Jeremy Myers from Citrix and Monica Grimmer from Citrix Bill, with Zintegger leading the delivery team. They were going on and on, not on and on. They were talking about the the Barbie movie and Oppenheimer and Barbenheimer, or whatever it is, and it was fun banter. And so I want to hit record as quick as I could. How’s it going, guys?

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Bill Sutton: Excellent! Yup, all right, Bill, did you go see the Barbie movie this weekend? Oh, no, my daughter, my 13 year old. That’s a lie. You said before he recorded you went, and you loved it. Go ahead and tell the truth. And Monica might have said that, but I didn’t say I did. All right. So, building I did. I went to see the Barbie movie. I went to A. Am. Showing of it, and it was still sold out. Everyone was in their pink.

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Monica Griesemer: Everyone was saying, Hi, Barbie! To each other.

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Monica Griesemer: You know, I was saying, we work hard, but the Barbie marketing team works harder. It’s really insane. The amount of marketing I’ve seen for this. It’s amazing. Did you? Did you dress? I did wear my pink. I absolutely did. I went with my mom and we had a great time. It’s a great mix of

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Monica Griesemer: the nostalgia makes with a little bit of unexpected and existentialism. So don’t mean to make this a a plug for the but it’s actually unexpected and quite good.

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Andy Whiteside: What? What? What? What? What? Why, is this happening? Why is

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Andy Whiteside: I mean, is this the first Barbie movie ever. What? Why is this so important? I’ll get it.

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Monica Griesemer: I it’s not the first Barbie movie ever, but I think everyone’s kind of jumping on the nostalgia train, and it’s backed by the by, the amazing Greta Gwig, who is the director of it? And

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Monica Griesemer: I don’t know. I just think it’s it’s a big deal it. It appeals to girls and their moms and their dads and their friends. So everyone’s kind of resurrecting it. But I think Mattel’s stock is about to Skyrocket if I had to bet.

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Andy Whiteside: Yeah.

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Geremy Meyers: Andy, I’m gonna go. I’m gonna go see it, Andy. I’ll tell you why. There’s 2 reasons. One.

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Geremy Meyers: it’s like, all right, anything that has become like a Pop culture sort of thing like, I’m not saying it’s Fomo. But you go all right. Let’s go. Let’s go check it out. If anything. There’s the curiosity factor right? There’s definitely that. And I think

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Geremy Meyers: the fact that you know Monica mentioned the director. But I mean unless you get Ryan Gosling like lumber. Hate him. You go. You’ve got certain calivers is like this is not a B list of actors doing the movie. I mean, this is a pretty legit list, and you go. Okay. Well, now, I’m not curious. I’ll see factors even up and forward. Listen, there’s not a Miss Alger factor.

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Geremy Meyers: You know I’ve been around Barbie. My whole life is, unless I was a kid of the eighties, for sure. But

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Andy Whiteside: now I’m curious for sure. So Jeremy, or or Andy, if you ever put together a Barbie dream house.

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Andy Whiteside: Oh, yeah.

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Bill Sutton: yeah, it’s not fun.

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Andy Whiteside: A lot of plastic parts that you’re trying to pop into place, and then you get them wrong, and you gotta take them out and put them the other way and take them out and they brides. Yeah, I’ve done it.

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Geremy Meyers: Yeah. But on the flip side the other side of this coin was Oppenheimer, the same weekend. So not even remotely related, I mean, honestly, it could be still a little existential. But still

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Andy Whiteside: I’m I’m super stuck about going to see that. Actually. So so let me take this and tie it back to tech. Have you guys seen the Apparently what somebody used artificial intelligence to blend the 2 movies together and came up with a video. Have you guys seen this? I will hang up right now and watch that if you post the link, let’s say, go check out my Linkedin. I posted it.

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Andy Whiteside: It was pretty amazing. Actually it was. It was pulled up in the background. We’ll we’ll share it and let it play for a second, and we’ll talk through it a little bit. But just go to my link to and look for a post over the weekend.

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Andy Whiteside: It was amazing. Now I don’t know if that was true.

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Andy Whiteside: I can’t. The the amount of effort someone would have to go through to do that manually themselves would be off the charts. AI could have done it, maybe in 1015 min, all by itself

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Andy Whiteside: it was. It was crazy. So that’s how we’re taking this back conversation back to Tech. So anybody go see Oppenheimer?

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Geremy Meyers: No, this not yet, not yet. No!

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Andy Whiteside: I had every intention of the world to go, and with my son, and then we got busy over the weekend, and we didn’t make it. But I will go see that one in the theater. I think I will wait for

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Geremy Meyers: Wait for it to come out on video somehow. Can you even say that, Mark? I’m gonna wait to Barbie, come out on video does that even? It’s not any more like, is it? It’s it’s you gotta say, I think the correct phrase is, when it comes out on streaming, or yeah, yeah. And even now, right? So I want to go see Oppenheimer really bad. But I kind of don’t want to leave my house. And so what I’ve gotten used to is on apple TV. It will let me rent things

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Geremy Meyers: at an obscene rate like it’s like I could buy it for $30 or rent it for like 20 bucks.

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Geremy Meyers: But I don’t want to leave the house. I’m the sort of person who likes to watch movies and chunks, so I’ll sit down and watch some of it, and then I’ll come back to it, and

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Geremy Meyers: I’m not really sure when that started. But, I don’t know I like to be at my house. I think that’s the main reason I said that I didn’t go see it. I just didn’t. I didn’t want to have to be on somebody else’s schedule. I’d rather just click a button sometime in my house and watch it.

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Geremy Meyers: There’s a tie in the tech there.

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Monica Griesemer: see I am a true cedar goer. I I love seeing a movie in a theater. So when we couldn’t during Covid it really was difficult for me. So I love that movies are back. So I’m on the opposite end of the spectrum.

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Geremy Meyers: I will say this, though. they recorded the Oppenheimer movie. And in Imax like the like, the full on Imax. And so I’ve been told, if you’re gonna go see it in the theater, you gotta go do that. Otherwise maybe you can see it at your house, but

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Geremy Meyers: I will look around. I’ve heard it was packed much like the

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Geremy Meyers: 10 Pm. Showing it was packed. Today I’m showing you.

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Andy Whiteside: I mean, you know, I don’t know when I was a kid in the nineties we could have

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Andy Whiteside: 5 blockbuster movies, 10 blockbuster movies come out every every every summer. Speaking of which, there’s a place, you know, a plan of fitness where I go. Work out now with my 14 year old, son, and there’s still a sign out front that there’s a blockbuster, and he’s like, Yeah, what’s a blockbuster?

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Andy Whiteside: The the blockbuster signed still there? but anyway, is it just the lack a limited amount of movies. So therefore. you know, we. we are making a video of these 2. I don’t know.

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Geremy Meyers: I’m I’m actually some of. I’m a huge World war, 2 history person. So I was really looking forward to Oppenheimer and just the history behind that. And I’m sure it’s more than just that. And then listen. The Barbie thing is just a cultural icon

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Geremy Meyers: curiosity factor for me, so I’ll probably go do it because it’s such a big deal.

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Monica Griesemer: and I’ve heard the cameos in. Both movies are insane. I can attest to the cameos and Barbie. It’s kind of like a game of where’s wall, though. like, you’re like, Oh, there’s John Cena, like, just out of nowhere.

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Geremy Meyers: that’s amazing.

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Andy Whiteside: Well, and so okay, I’ll tie back to this podcast real, quick, hopefully, people listening are still listening and haven’t cut it off at this point. But you know, when you go see a movie about World War Ii or Barbie, and you’re learning. I don’t know about the Barbie one, but you’re learning something like the Oppenheimer one, and you’re entertained at the same time. That is the best way.

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Andy Whiteside: That is the best way to learn, and a lot of the podcasts to listen to are kind of, like the entertaining, yet learning all the same time.

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Andy Whiteside: He I don’t know if it was while recording or not, but the link for today was working a minute ago. And now I can’t. It’s not working. So any idea how I get the link for today’s content for the podcast

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Geremy Meyers: all right? I’m gonna post, the link. No, it was redirecting to the broken link. But try to add.

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Geremy Meyers: Okay, try that. So, Andy, we we just now I’m going to talk about the sausage. And so we did switch

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Geremy Meyers: hosting platforms for the blog. And

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Geremy Meyers: you know it’s part of the translation of the links, apparently a couple of them to get translation just right? So

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Andy Whiteside: well, I crap.

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Monica Griesemer: try it in an incognito window.

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Andy Whiteside: Okay.

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Geremy Meyers: this is technical support in action. Right now. if this doesn’t work. Then

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Geremy Meyers: we’re going to grab some traces. We’re going to send that to the Dev Analysis team. We’ll get back to you in 7 to 10 days.

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Geremy Meyers: Bill knows what I’m talking about. Price. Yeah, you got the choice.

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Andy Whiteside: so I’d search for it incognito. Hold on! Let me give me copy and paste that. Sorry

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Geremy Meyers: you talk about. keep talking about the movie.

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Monica Griesemer: Yeah, I mean, I I’ll tie it back to marketing. Actually, because I brought that up earlier. I think the Barbie team as a marketer myself. It’s been a feat of collaborations, a partner marketing of alliance marketing. So to tie it back to my life. It’s been

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Monica Griesemer: pretty unreal. My mom and I last night we’re watching an HD TV show where they’re creating a real life. Barbie Dream House. And it’s a competition.

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Monica Griesemer: So they’ve they’ve tied it into Httv. Discovery. Chevy’s on board. I’ve seen Ruggable. There’s rugged. There’s anything any partner alliance you could think of. Barbie probably has a stake in it. So in terms of a marketing moment, it’s really a master class, I can. I can see us studying this for me for years to come.

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Monica Griesemer: Did that take away from the movie? Did you find yourself not even paying attention to what was going on? Because you noticed so they did a pretty good job in the movie of not plugging too many brands. It was external to it. The only ones I noticed in the movie were Chevy. I noticed Chanel.

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Monica Griesemer: and those were the big ones that that I noticed. So they did. A pretty good job of not being like Barbie is holding a coca cola, you know. So it was more out of out of product. If you look at the

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Monica Griesemer: the movie as being a product, it was more out of product marketing, which I found very impressive.

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Geremy Meyers: That’s interesting.

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Andy Whiteside: all right, let’s see. Oh, I just got I cannot get back to this thing.

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Andy Whiteside: I’ve got it up. I can share it.

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Monica Griesemer: Can you allow it?

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Andy Whiteside: I’m just gonna make you a co-host on the fly here. Okay.

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Geremy Meyers: I will say this. So the Oppenheimer movie is, I think, 3 h long. It’s a long and is what it is. And I probably watched as many videos on Youtube about that era of all the things just going down. Youtube rat holes

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Geremy Meyers: like this is how the bomb worked, and this is the little history behind Oppenheimer himself and his circle. And

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Geremy Meyers: just so much information. So, Monica, you’re on the enhancing security and compliance. Is that where we left off last time, or you want to recap a little bit, I believe. So. Yeah. So now that we’re jumping into it, switching gears a little bit. But talking about marketing, talking about products across the board and technology.

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Monica Griesemer: we are recapping the what’s new with Steve, Ad. 2305 and cloud updates. So the updates from the past quarter. This is our incredibly long blog that we do quarterly to discuss the different features that have come out. So in the previous 2 blogs we recap the information on features concerning operational it and efficiency as well as workload and device flexibility.

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Monica Griesemer: So where I think we left off a couple of weeks ago is, we were talking about our alliance partners as your Google Microsoft. We spoke to the Linux Vda and things happening with endpoint management. So we’ve been talking a lot about how to improve admin experience, how to improve our, how we’ve improved our relationship with our hyper scalars. And now today, I think we’re going to jump into

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Monica Griesemer: how we’ve enhanced security. So while I I have the proverbial mic here, I’ll also say a lot of this content. I was helped with with my fellow Pms. Who cover secure private access and Citrix analytics, so would love to have an open discussion. I’m not as big of an expert on these pieces. I did get quite a lot of help, but still great topics for us to cover today. So excited to get into it.

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Okay.

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Andy Whiteside: so, Monica, since you’re gonna be driving us look. So maybe I’ll drive us. So the general idea that Citrix continues to invest in security and compliance.

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Andy Whiteside: That’s important. Still, right?

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Monica Griesemer: A, absolutely. Yeah. So I think we’re also, I know we’re also coming back. The idea concept of 0 trust everything we do has an underlying

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Monica Griesemer: red thread back to making sure we go with the 0 trust initiatives, and everything needs to be secure. Right? That’s why we’re doing virtualization. In the first place. Yes, it’s centralization, and it’s making Admins lives easier. But it’s knowing where all of your data is and having your hands on it and being able to lock it down, being able to add security policies around it. That is something we will always hang our hats on is making things incredibly secure. So

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Andy Whiteside: we have not dwindled in our efforts here.

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Andy Whiteside: So there’s that. And then there’s the new things we’re going to talk about. And then just session recording. And we’re on that we did a podcast last week, a webinar with a Google and Citrix and one of the one of the folks listening said, does that mean citrus can spy on me or my company conspire me, and the answer is, Yes, but that’s not the intent. The intent is to provide you better experience in security and being able to watch and see what’s going on, you know, using analytics, not watching you real time, full time.

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Andy Whiteside: but having an idea what’s going on. That is a security play that trumps almost everything else out there. in terms of what it can do for the organization and the environment.

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Andy Whiteside: before I move on. regarding the legacy of Citrix And then, when I say Citrix, I mean, you know the presented desktops presented apps from a Vdi or from a server OS

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Bill Sutton: bill your thoughts on that as a security up strategy. No, I completely agree. of course I I I don’t. I don’t know what to read into. You wanted me to talk about a legacy product. So you know, calling me old or something, maybe Nevertheless, I’ve just given you a rough time, Andy. Now. I’m sorry I called it legacy, because it is as viable today as it is

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Bill Sutton: it I mean, when you look at the legacy of this, though they’ve been going back to the early days of Windframe and presentation server, I mean the the same principles to your point. Apply

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Bill Sutton: centralizing the delivery to the data center, limiting the amount the traffic that can that can pass between the endpoint and the data center to only the Ica or Hdx traffic and locking down things like clipboard and local local drives. And all of those things really enhance security in the data center. From the standpoint of the endpoint, the endpoint really doesn’t have any access into the data center in that situation

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other than just the remoting protocol which obviously.

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Bill Sutton: without question and answer security. And then you bring that forward to the day, and we’ve got even more capabilities with with the ability to watermark and the ability to do key logger protection app protection. so it has come. Full circle but the tenants the foundation

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Andy Whiteside: has been there for years. But, Bill, even take the remoting protocol and turn off printing. Turn off clipboard mapping, I mean, what what do you have left at that point, taking a picture of the screen. Really pretty much. Yep. And now, with that protection, you can still take a picture of the screen. But your username and IP address will be all over the picture.

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Andy Whiteside: It’s I. I often use Wiki links as an example. Had Wiki links to? Where had the Government been using Citrix to present

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Andy Whiteside: that solution instead of allowing full access to those files, Wiki links would never happen

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Geremy Meyers: in all likelihood. You’re right.

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Andy Whiteside: yeah, Jeremy chime in on the general idea that that what we call citrix, as if it’s a a verb or some type of certain object as a security play is is a a viable thing

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Geremy Meyers: I mean a hundred, I mean, even the roots of the product like you said. By the way, I’m glad you picked Bill first makes me feel slightly younger, but I mean it was performance, and security is what it was right performance, because it was client server apps back when that product was first introduced, and the idea of doing that across

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Geremy Meyers: a VPN. That was probably made up of not a VPN. But it like a dial in link. So, Monica, I’m gonna throw that one at you. We used to have servers with modem banks in it.

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Geremy Meyers: Diggy boards. That’s right. That’s how you dialed in. That was your quote, unquote. VPN, so there you go.

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Geremy Meyers: But I mean it was performance. And then the other piece of it was security, right? So I mean, it was very much client server. If you had a laptop and you had data on it.

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Geremy Meyers: I mean, you were at risk.

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Geremy Meyers: But I think because you’ve centralized it, you open up so many other outside of just containing the data which is awesome. Right? So now I can restrict copy and paste and things like that. But you know the fact that we’ve centralized it from a security perspective. And we just unlock so much more ability, right? And so session recording is one of those pieces, you know. App protection is one of those pieces.

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Geremy Meyers: it’s just. There’s just so much visibility around where the data is what’s happening, and even to integrate tools that aren’t even Citrix related. Right? So if you have a Dlp solution, or I guess what that can sit inside that virtual desktop. And there’s so many pieces that you can layer on to this solution that just don’t get unlocked. If you’re doing this all remotely, it’s tough.

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Andy Whiteside: Yeah. all right, Monica, educate us on the 3 bullets that that are new, or, you know, updated or new.

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Monica Griesemer: Yeah. So we’re gonna kick this section off with session recording. I know we’ve spoken about it a little bit here this morning, but

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Monica Griesemer: I like, and just like Andy how you said folks are asking you if Citrix was spying on you a valid question.

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Monica Griesemer: The answer you said, yes, I mean, the thing is with the citric session recording technologies. Yes, it is recording your user session. Almost always it has a pop up that says that is happening like, Hello, we are recording your session. And as a user, you have to acknowledge that.

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Monica Griesemer: But additionally, it’s huge for troubleshooting. We were actually just talking about troubleshooting the blog site right? Maybe if we saw Andy, what was happening on your side and had a recording of your screen, we could fix the problem like that.

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Monica Griesemer: But to that point everything is watching us all of the time anymore. I think we would be kind of naive to think the opposite. But even with that there’s specific parameters that Citrix Admins can put around session recording. For example, we’re working on. We have screen recordings, you know, kind of cutting edge stuff we’re working on audio recordings, just specific things to give admins more flexibility.

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Monica Griesemer: specific to what we had last quarter, both on premises and in the cloud. We’re innovating with session recording.

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Monica Griesemer: So in the cloud service, we’ve introduced new activity feeds. That’s something that’s great within the cloud is we can have a lot more dynamic dashboards to allow admins to see what is happening within their session recording servers. So they’re built in. And they have system event logs, tasks, progress and Api history.

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Monica Griesemer: We’ve also added a new client demon to maintain the running state of the client and try to fix it automatically if the client runs up normally. And then, lastly, for the cloud and session recording, we’ve added email admins for session recording events. So if the CPU is too high or your storage is overloaded within session recording service. Your Admin will simply get an email about it. So just really improving that experience and tandem with the security

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Andy Whiteside: I I do want to chime in. The the question was, can Citrix spy on me? And it’s your customer, the the customers it department

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Andy Whiteside: they could. But they can. They can look at everything you’re doing already. Yes, technology to get smarter and better and have the ability to do trainings and proactive support things. It it it’s your company’s technology. Yes, of course they can. They can do anything they want with it. This just all of us to do things better.

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Monica Griesemer: totally agree.

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Geremy Meyers: So, Andy. This was not in the blog post, but this was something that I got from one of the Pm’s What we’ve also introduced here. So it mentioned support for a azure. SQL database. So you know, in the past we’ve always had to stand up some sort of sequel database to host

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Geremy Meyers: just information about the sessions.

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Geremy Meyers: you know, things like that. That’s what it tied into. But there’s a new service. It’s a simplified session recording service. So if you’re doing this in the cloud from session recording, there’s a workflow where you can press a button and it will automatically

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Geremy Meyers: push out session recording servers, it’ll configure as your sequel. It’ll set up any of the load balancing required, for you know, redundancy as well as a location within azure fires files to host the recording. So again, trying to simplify that deployment. If you did this on Prem, and you pulled up the architecture of what session recording looked like there was a lot of stuff you had to go. Turn on.

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Geremy Meyers: Now, what’s nice about the cloud is? It’s been all right. We can integrate and actually host some of those components

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Geremy Meyers: of session recording. But now we’ve got a the next level, which is, you press a button and actually have all these components deployed for you within your azure subscription, which is fantastic, obviously means you got to be using azure in this case. But it’s just simplifying, turning this on and getting it running. So again, I think the idea is, how how can we enable customers and administrators to turn this on which is the least amount of effort which has always been a roadblock in the past.

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you know.

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Bill Sutton: Yeah, I would agree with that. It definitely has been a roadblock, Jeremy, it’s a lot of folks have wanted this, but obviously the the ramp to getting there was maybe too high or or appeared to be too high or too complex, and certainly the simplification. And I and I also wanted to come. And I want Monica set, which I really like, which is using this as a

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Bill Sutton: troubleshooting tool. And I don’t know how many times in my time, in my days with as a consultant, I, you know, go to a customer, so they say. Well, Sally, the assistant to the CEO, had a an issue last week at 40’clock, where it the session froze, or they couldn’t access their application properly, or they were getting errors. What’s the area? Well, they didn’t record it. They didn’t write it down. So, having the ability to to be able to go back and look at that

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Bill Sutton: and see what actually happened. if you’ve got it set up correctly, is certainly very beneficial from a troubleshooting perspective and be able to resolve issues and and make the experience better.

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Geremy Meyers: But a lot of cases is not a technical issue. It’s just a user training issue like you’ve got, you’ve got end users, you the end of the day. You gotta look over end user shoulder sometimes just to see what they’re doing, because they sometimes they’re just doing it well, even though they won’t describe it that way.

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Andy Whiteside: I have a story on this one where we were doing a a proof of concept to roll out of the hospital. Actually, it’s a local hospital here, Jeremy, you would know if I said their name and we were doing the user acceptance testing. And it was just within the internal it team. And we had session recording turned on. But the people doing it did not know we had session recording turned on and they reported. One of the department leads reported that it didn’t work and it was broken, it being Citrix.

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Andy Whiteside: and we went back and watched the session. They did something with an app that everybody in the company knew didn’t work. It was the app that was broken, and they did that intentionally in the testing so they could turn around and say that something was broken within Citrix. True story.

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Geremy Meyers: That’s amazing. That’s amazing.

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Monica Griesemer: All right. Monica. Anything else on this part you want to cover.

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Monica Griesemer: We block one or more second recordings prior to the occurrence of the session pause so that the block to prevent a gap

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Monica Griesemer: when the recording can be blocked. So we we’re just recording ahead of time and then support for sharing recordings as unrestricted links. I’ve been working with my the Pm. On this a bit. And I was like, Okay, what does this mean.

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Monica Griesemer: it’s really an easier way for Admins to have specific credentials. So it’s still incredibly secure to more easily share those recordings. So, Andy, in your case, your Admins on the back end right needed to see these recordings, and maybe one of your colleagues who has the rights to it. You needed to send them a link directly to to be able to prove your point. It’s just an easier way to share amongst

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Geremy Meyers: Admins who have the rights to view them. So the creation of the links is logged and secured with the recording hosted on the session, recording infrastructure. So making those troubleshooting and incident reportings easier to locate and share.

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Geremy Meyers: Sure, you know, you work for the companies, their technology. You sign some sort of, you know, terms of service, right? acceptable use policy. But

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Geremy Meyers: you know, these recordings might be hosted and managed by a security team right? They want to keep this, or maybe even Hr, right? But you’ve got a group of folks who need to own these for whatever reason, you know, probably compliance wise. It sounds like, you know, if I needed to extend this out to a specific admin. I could send a link unrestricted, probably time down if I had to imagine, to give folks access to a specific thing without giving them access to the console and any of the other pieces that are part of the infrastructure. Right? Just keep kind of keep it simple.

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Monica Griesemer: Yep.

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Monica Griesemer: yeah. So the next one on the list is we are getting into some secure private access updates. So

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Monica Griesemer: on the whole, secure private access for great starting to create more and more for walking down those web and sas applications, adding

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Monica Griesemer: watermarks, adding policies on top of those, and we’re just continuously throwing features in here. So a couple that I’m specifically talking to here first today is we have now have support for Dns suffix. So when using the citric secure access agent to access file shares. The customer can enable the Csa agent to resolve, non fully qualified donate domain name to a fully qualified domain. Name.

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Monica Griesemer: So this is through adding Dns suffix domain for the back end servers. So continuing to add that support that our Admins are used to.

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Geremy Meyers: This is great. By the way, I’m so used to just doing, you know, as an admin doing backslash back to last server name trying to hit a network share or something like that. I mean, it’s just like second nature. Now, granted with ad, I’ve gotten used to typing a fully qualified domain name in certain cases. But the fact that I can just go back to either mapping a share based on a server name, knowing that it’s going to resolve based on it. Looks like I can do a priority list of Dns suffixes. But either way, this is pretty slick.

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Andy Whiteside: No, it is it? It’s really powerful. Most users

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Andy Whiteside: don’t know

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Andy Whiteside: how important domain and host names are in today’s world because a lot of people just throw it in a search search window and search for it amazingly. The link comes up and you click on it versus going straight there.

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Geremy Meyers: But it still applies in the last

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Monica Griesemer: absolutely and continuing on with spa updates. So secure private access updates, we’ve added application discovery. So this provides automated discovery and reporting of those internal applications. And IP addresses. So sometimes there’s internal applications

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Monica Griesemer: where Admins don’t have visibility to them, or they don’t have as much security parameters around them. So app discovery actually shows up in a dashboard. And you’ve got timelines of the apps that Spa discovered how many users are there, how often people go there. So it just gives you more and more visibility into your environments. And you don’t have that like shadow it, or people

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Monica Griesemer: you, you have more visibility into what’s going on. So this is a pretty big deal.

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Andy Whiteside: not a huge deal. I I’ve been on multiple calls in the last

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Andy Whiteside: 2 business days, Friday. And then today, talking about, you know, Browser related. And you non what we would call Citrix, using air quotes here applications, which would be things that we’re doing through a browser and and other applications versus, you know, published app published desktop Vdi scenario, and more and more of the world is under the impression that we’re gonna move to Browser based things as we go forward, things like secure private access.

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Andy Whiteside: and then allowing access from the outside back in to those technologies on the back end, while still getting all the analytics go with it. When when somebody says I know everything about Citrix and what Citrix does, and I realize right away they don’t know this part of the citric story, then they really don’t know, Citrix.

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Geremy Meyers: So what I love about what I love about this is number one. It’s the only reason the solution exists is because with existing VPN, we don’t know what’s running across them. So we have turned this thing on. It opens itself up to the world, you know, just traditional legacy. VPN, and so you’ve got folks using it. So when you transition to a solution which, by the way, you know, VPN, for the most part, are trust by default, and then start dialing things back, which is hard to manage by the way.

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Geremy Meyers: the citric solution is 0 trust by default, and then enable services based on what folks need. And so the challenges migrating from legacy VPN is, you don’t know what’s going across the VPN. What do I need to support. What are folks doing? Some of it’s going to be shadow it. Some of it’s just legitimate. But at the end of the day it’s really tough to tell. And so what this does is you get visibility into.

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Geremy Meyers: You know what’s out there. And then, if I understand correctly, this is the hope, Monica. So keep me straight here, because this is something that we’ve been working on for a while. That’s finally going live, but based on what the tool sees can it automatically create rules for it based on like a workflow where you go? Oh, yeah, this website here, I’m looking at the top here.

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Geremy Meyers: folks are going to yahoo.com. Maybe a bad example. But let’s just say, yahoo.com is a is a is something that we need to to turn on, will it?

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Geremy Meyers: Let me go through and actually create a a rule based on what I see?

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Monica Griesemer: I believe so. But don’t hold me to that.

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Geremy Meyers: It does say, create app. So this is Andy zoomed in

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Geremy Meyers: in the far right corner. It looks like, based on what it discovered. You can create an app based on that discovery and just go ahead and create a rule. So that’s pretty.

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Geremy Meyers: That’s very cool.

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Bill Sutton: I understand this correct, that you would turn this on once you add Spa in place, and essentially be treating it like a VPN. Kind of like a discovery almost like a white list, and then

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Bill Sutton: start dialing it back just like you do with the VPN. Or is this a separate product that you had

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Bill Sutton: run before you put in Spa?

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Geremy Meyers: So this would be something that is already a part of Spa. You would create. Probably you probably open it up and just let folks do their normal job with the new solution right? And then, once you’ve discovered what’s out there, you create your policies and eventually just turn off open access. That makes sense. That’s kind of what I was where I was going. Okay, make sense.

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Monica Griesemer: Yup. We’ve also to Spa. We also added rest Apis to app and access policy configurations in a tech preview right now. So this should be coming soon.

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Monica Griesemer: So in hybrid deployments today, automation of management tasks is really important. And Spa Api’s allow for that automation of creation and updating of applications and access policies. So just adding an Api to the Api Library to automate this stuff. So I feel like Apis, or where we’re going. You were talking about writing code, doing a lot of backslashes, but incorporating this to make

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Monica Griesemer: applications and access policies even simpler and even more automated, is a really great step forward for making Admins lives easier.

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Geremy Meyers: I mean, I would say, not only making Admins lives easier, I think 5 years from now everything is just going to be automated like, if you’re an admin, what you’re good at is just automating processes is what it is. And so every just about anything we do in the cloud. Honestly, most vendors. Now they’re adding Rest Apis specifically to automate everything about it. I mean, I’m thinking of Trevor and his Msp. Business, Andy. I’m just thinking like, how do you

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Andy Whiteside: just not automate the crap out of everything, you know. I think that’s where it needs to be.

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Geremy Meyers: I mean, we were. We were automating by scripting like my whole goal was not to be the laziest admin ever right. Whatever I could do to not have to do anything

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Geremy Meyers: sounds terrible, but that was the goal. But to your point, automation today doesn’t necessarily mean or writing scripts. Maybe that’s what it means from like A, you know, get a Json file that I’m using to deploy as your things with. But it’s for the integration between products. Right? So you know the idea that I can go to a service now and define a workflow which, by the way, could be, I’m onboarding a new user.

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Geremy Meyers: Do these things. Service now needs to be able to tie into all those different platforms to make it happen. And so what Citrus is doing is opening up this Api to make that happen.

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Andy Whiteside: Yeah, for sure.

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Monica Griesemer: And then I, yeah.

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Monica Griesemer: I believe the last section here of our

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Monica Griesemer: security is speaking to analytics. So I guess the theme of this blog. I was feeling a lot like visibility, admin visibility which obviously ties into security. So our analytics for security product line is continuing to get more and more features as well. And we currently have a tech preview for username masking and are equipping our customers

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Monica Griesemer: with more flexibility in terms of role-based access control. So we are adding privacy, administrator role in addition to the full admin and read-only admin. So

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Monica Griesemer: I believe this is.

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Monica Griesemer: it’s kind of the median between being a full admin on session or not test recording sorry analytics or security, and being a read only admin. So you, I believe, have kind of a Median amount of rights. I need to double check exactly what

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Monica Griesemer: privacy Admins can do, but just adding more options for role-based access control for Admins.

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Andy Whiteside: So

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Andy Whiteside: so we’re getting more granular. Right? That’s what we’re doing being under control. And this. And we’re still in the Spa conversation.

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Andy Whiteside: We’re in analytics for security now. So I switch gears on you. You did, and I got distracted for 2 s. I’m blowing up over here, I understand. No. So so you know, that’s a very common conversation. We talk about security administration on the back end. Who has access to this stuff. It’s great we got it.

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Andy Whiteside: But whether it’s, you know, session recordings or analytics, you know how Gran? Or can we get on controlling by? Well, by default? Who has access to it like nobody unless they’re opt it in. And then how grain? Or can we get

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Monica Griesemer: exactly?

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Monica Griesemer: And I know we bring up role-based access control a lot across the board. So across all of our products, it’s

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Monica Griesemer: who has access to it. But what can they do? And once they do get access to it. And that’s huge. Like I,

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Monica Griesemer: I could read only things or I could fully break environments. Sometimes on the back end, I’m in test or demo environments. I’m like, I feel like I have too many rights here like I could break this if I wanted to. I shouldn’t have that in my hands. So rule-based access control is incredibly important. Not that I would intentionally try to break anything, but having the power to

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Andy Whiteside: with great power comes great with responsibility.

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Monica Griesemer: Absolutely.

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Geremy Meyers: There was. There was a time that I’m sure, and the and bill. Remember when everyone was a domain. Admin, if you’re an admin on the network you’re probably domain admin.

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Geremy Meyers: And then all it took was security breaches and folks doing some scorely things under that domain admin account that they had to start logging what folks did. So then you had your super user account, and then you had your. This is what I normally sort of just do to do my day to day, job, you know, maybe some elevated privileges. But ultimately, you know, this is really important, like a lot of enterprise environments need to be able to differentiate

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Geremy Meyers: who has access to what? And so

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Geremy Meyers: I mean, I’d be curious to see what some of our larger customers are doing. But I gotta imagine you’re going to get to the point where you’re a read-only administrator for a lot of things, and only a handful of folks have access to full administration.

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Geremy Meyers: you know, and that might even be security team. It might be a user account you only use when you go in and configure things.

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Geremy Meyers: but you know, this is why we’re adding all these privileged levels and and whatnot is, you know, we gotta be able to log what folks are doing, and most folks don’t need configuration rights to everything. So what it is and and i’d argue that even read only administrators should be the default for most folks.

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Geremy Meyers:  100 and until you need it. You shouldn’t have it and most of those that need that need it

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Bill Sutton: have to survive, a or have to be able to go through an Mfa. Challenge a multi-factor challenge and to get in even using their admin account.

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Geremy Meyers: Yup.

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Monica Griesemer: and then the last piece that we had in the Security section is, we’ve added azure we’ve added new integration for azure, active directory users and groups. So added this into analytics for security as your ad users and groups. So just continuing to add those features and capabilities like, I said, this is the last part of the Security section, but that doesn’t mean we have to end our conversation here. We got some beef.

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Monica Griesemer: So.

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Monica Griesemer: Andy, I’ll let you make the call if we want to keep rolling, or for moving this on to a part 4 as well.

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Andy Whiteside: I I don’t know, because I can’t see the blog. I don’t know how much, how far we could get in the next one in 5 min. I’m not sure if we could cover this in in 5 min. There’s a lot of good topics here, it’s about employing experience.

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Andy Whiteside: The last thing we care about is how this impacts the users. I’ll try this. I’ll tie this together. Okay, so yeah, so it looks like, that’s the all right. So so Jeremy just made an a a comment which is funny. But true, we have been talking about security. We’re gonna to talk about end-user experience. Those 2 things matter more than everything else we could possibly talk about. So let’s don’t try to rush through that we’ll we’ll make it a part for

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Bill Sutton: good.

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Geremy Meyers: Perfect.

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Andy Whiteside: all right. Well, guys, thanks for thanks for having great conversation around the movies and some of the security things changing in the citrus world around. 2,305 and dance we’ll pick it up again next week.

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Monica Griesemer: Excellent!

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Andy Whiteside: Alright, thanks.